Melanoma death cases in new jersey

Get Your Sun Screen

August 16, 2017
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There are only a few weeks of summer left, and we want to get the last of that summer sun…

Unfortunately, this can cause us to make bad decisions – more time in the water, not applying sunscreen, not re-applying sunscreen, soaking up those rays …

The correct application of sunscreen is as important now as it was in early July. And many of us are still not getting it right

A recent study presented at the British Association of Dermatologists’ Annual Conference, 2017 discussed an experiment where 57 people were asked to put on sunscreen. 75% of the people who applied sunscreen did not put it in the area between the inner corner of the eye and the bridge of the nose. The results were seen after taking a photograph of the participants with a UV sensitive camera.

The participants were missing approximately 10% of the face.

This might explain why 5-10% of skin cancers are cancers of the eyelid, usually basal cell carcinomas or squamous cell carcinomas. In 2014, the most recent year for which statistics are available, 9,324 people in the USA died from melanomas of the skin.

Why are we missing these areas?

The study stated that one of the main reasons we miss these areas is because we heed the warning on the bottle: don’t let the lotion get into your eyes. (Mass Torts Case anyone??)

What did the authors of the study suggest?

Get sunglasses and wear sunglasses.

Sunglasses protect the eyes from UV sun damage and also protect the eyelids from cancer.

Skin cancer can be deadly. One American dies every hour from melanoma. Melanoma is the second most common form of cancer for adolescents and young adults.

Skin cancer is surprisingly more prevalent in areas we might not expect it.

What county in New Jersey has the highest melanoma death rate?

Ocean or Cape May County? No.

The correct answer is Warren County – 63% higher than the national average!

Nearly 245 people die every year of Melanoma in New Jersey.

We urge you to regularly apply sunscreen and wear sun-glasses when outside— whether in the heat of summer or skiing in January. Cancer is terrible. We haven’t cured it yet but, with some of these steps, we can do our best to prevent it.